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Fallen from Heaven

by Vanity

You had fallen from heaven straight into my arms,
Igniting my heart with your sweet seductive charms.
Showed me light in life that I’d never seen before,
Something that my heart and soul had been longing for.
Spread your caring angel wings right over my head,
Protecting me and saying what had not been said.

Those three simple words that I was needing to hear,
Were right in-front of my blind eyes but was unclear.
Clouds were smothering me and all that was around,
Until an angel flew down and then you were found.
The smoke disappeared leaving a vision of you,
A strong feeling of love that seemed long overdue.

The way that you would shelter my soul from the rain,
As you would clear away the storm ridding my pain.
You’d feel and heal the beating of my broken heart,
Painting a smile on my face like a piece of art.
Released all the emotions that were trapped inside,
Warm fuzzy feelings that I’d always try to hide.

Romantic enchanted fairy-tales pranced in my mind,
In books of make believe; my prince I needed to find.
Sweet tunes would play as I would look into your eyes,
And I could see the man who was hidden in disguise.
The Savior who had fallen from heaven above,
Is now the angel who helped me believe in love.

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Posted by on May 3, 2011 in Love, Poem

 

The Dark Candle

by Strickland Gillilan

A man had a little daughter-an only and much-beloved child. He lived for her – she was his life. So when she became ill and her illness resisted the efforts of the best obtainable physicians, he became like a man possessed, moving heaven and earth to bring about her restoration to health.

His best efforts proved unavailing and the child died. The father was totally irreconcilable. He became a bitter recluse, shutting himself away from his many friends and refusing every activity that might restore his poise and bring him back to his normal self. But one night he had a dream. He was in Heaven, and was witnessing a grand pageant of all the little child angels. They were marching in an apparently endless line past the Great White Throne. Every white-robed angelic tot carried a candle. He noticed that one child’s candle was not lighted. Then he saw that the child with the dark candle was his own little girl. Rushing to her, while the pageant faltered, he seized her in his arms, caressed her tenderly, and then asked: “How is it, darling that your candle alone is unlighted?”

“Father, they often relight it, but your tears always put it out.”

Just then he awoke from his dream. The lesson was crystal clear, and its effects were immediate. From that hour on, he was not a recluse, but mingled freely and cheerfully with his former friends and associates. No longer would his little darling’s candle be extinguished by his useless tears.

 
 

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Thinking Happiness

by Robert E. Farley

Think of the things that make you happy,
Not the things that make you sad;
Think of the fine and true in mankind,
Not its sordid side and bad;
Think of the blessings that surround you,
Not the ones that are denied;
Think of the virtues of your friendships,
Not the weak and faulty side;

Think of the gains you’ve made in business,
Not the losses you’ve incurred;
Think of the good of you that’s spoken,
Not some cruel, hostile word;
Think of the days of health and pleasure,
Not the days of woe and pain;
Think of the days alive wth sunshine,
Not the dismal days of rain;

Think of the hopes that lie before you,
Not the waste that lies behind;
Think of the treasures you have gathered,
Not the ones you’ve failed to find;
Think of the service you may render,
Not of serving self alone;
Think of the happiness of others,
And in this you’ll find your own!

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2011 in Happiness, Poem

 

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You Are The Light

by G. Gonzalo

In my eyes you will always be the light

Together with you everything seems right

The times we’ve spent were the best

But now I’m all alone, you have laid to rest

Now, everything seems bleak and dark

Even when I’m under the sun-drenched park

I can’t help it if my tears are falling

Every time I remember you calling

I would really love to be with you

This earth I would leave too

I’d be with you till my time ends

For now, memories of you will never end.

 
 

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The Lion Makers

(A tale from Panchatantra in India)


In a certain town were four Brahmans who lived in friendship. Three of them had reached the far shore of all scholarship, but lacked sense. The other found scholarship distasteful; he had nothing but sense. 

One day they met for consultation. “What is the use of attainments,” said they, “If one does not travel, win the favor of kings, and acquire money? Whatever we do, let us all travel.” 

But when they had gone a little way, the eldest of them said: “One of us, the fourth, is a dullard, having nothing but sense. Now nobody gains the favorable attention of kings by simple sense without scholarship. Therefore we will not share our earnings with him. Let him turn back and go home.”

Then the second said: “My intelligent friend, you lack scholarship. Please go home.” But the third said: “No, no. This is no way to behave. For we have played together since we were little boys. Come along, my noble friend. You shall have a share of the money we earn.’  

With this agreement they continued their journey, and in a forest they found the bones of a dead lion. Thereupon one of them said: “A good opportunity to test the ripeness of our scholarship. Here lies some kind of creature, dead. Let us bring it to life by means of the scholarship we have honestly won.” 

Then the first said: “I know how to assemble the skeleton.” The second said: “I can supply skin, flesh, and blood.” The third said: “I can give it life.” So the first assembled the skeleton, the second provided skin, flesh, and blood. But while the third was intent on giving the breath of life, the man of sense advised against it, remarking: “This is a lion. If you bring him to life, he will kill every one of us.”  

“You simpleton!” said the other, “it is not I who will reduce scholarship to a nullity.” “In that case,” came the reply, “wait a moment, while I climb this convenient tree.” 

When this had been done, the lion was brought to life, rose up, and killed all three. But the man of sense, after the lion had gone elsewhere, climbed down and went home.

And that is why I say: 

“Scholarship is less than sense; 
Therefore seek intelligence: 
Senseless scholars in their pride 
Made a lion; then they died.”

 
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Posted by on April 18, 2011 in Tale

 

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On Seeing The 100% Perfect Girl One Beautiful April Morning

by Haruki Murakami

One beautiful April morning, on a narrow side street inTokyo’s fashionable Harujuku neighborhood, I walked past the 100% perfect girl.

Tell you the truth, she’s not that good-looking. She doesn’t stand out in any way. Her clothes are nothing special. The back of her hair is still bent out of shape from sleep. She isn’t young, either – must be near thirty, not even close to a “girl,” properly speaking. But still, I know from fifty yards away: She’s the 100% perfect girl for me. The moment I see her, there’s a rumbling in my chest, and my mouth is as dry as a desert.

Maybe you have your own particular favorite type of girl – one with slim ankles, say, or big eyes, or graceful fingers, or you’re drawn for no good reason to girls who take their time with every meal. I have my own preferences, of course. Sometimes in a restaurant I’ll catch myself staring at the girl at the next table to mine because I like the shape of her nose.

But no one can insist that his 100% perfect girl correspond to some preconceived type. Much as I like noses, I can’t recall the shape of hers – or even if she had one. All I can remember for sure is that she was no great beauty. It’s weird.

“Yesterday on the street I passed the 100% girl,” I tell someone.

“Yeah?” he says. “Good-looking?”

“Not really.”

“Your favorite type, then?”

“I don’t know. I can’t seem to remember anything about her – the shape of her eyes or the size of her breasts.”

“Strange.”

“Yeah. Strange.”

“So anyhow,” he says, already bored, “what did you do? Talk to her? Follow her?”

“Nah. Just passed her on the street.”

She’s walking east to west, and I west to east. It’s a really nice April morning.

Wish I could talk to her. Half an hour would be plenty: just ask her about herself, tell her about myself, and – what I’d really like to do – explain to her the complexities of fate that have led to our passing each other on a side street in Harajuku on a beautiful April morning in 1981. This was something sure to be crammed full of warm secrets, like an antique clock build when peace filled the world.

After talking, we’d have lunch somewhere, maybe see a Woody Allen movie, and stop by a hotel bar for cocktails. With any kind of luck, we might end up in bed.

Potentiality knocks on the door of my heart.

Now the distance between us has narrowed to fifteen yards.

How can I approach her? What should I say?

“Good morning, miss. Do you think you could spare half an hour for a little conversation?”

Ridiculous. I’d sound like an insurance salesman.

“Pardon me, but would you happen to know if there is an all-night cleaners in the neighborhood?”

No, this is just as ridiculous. I’m not carrying any laundry, for one thing. Who’s going to buy a line like that?

Maybe the simple truth would do. “Good morning. You are the 100% perfect girl for me.”

No, she wouldn’t believe it. Or even if she did, she might not want to talk to me. Sorry, she could say, I might be the 100% perfect girl for you, but you’re not the 100% boy for me. It could happen. And if I found myself in that situation, I’d probably go to pieces. I’d never recover from the shock. I’m thirty-two, and that’s what growing older is all about.

We pass in front of a flower shop. A small, warm air mass touches my skin. The asphalt is damp, and I catch the scent of roses. I can’t bring myself to speak to her. She wears a white sweater, and in her right hand she holds a crisp white envelope lacking only a stamp. So: She’s written somebody a letter, maybe spent the whole night writing, to judge from the sleepy look in her eyes. The envelope could contain every secret she’s ever had.

I take a few more strides and turn: She’s lost in the crowd. 

Now, of course, I know exactly what I should have said to her. It would have been a long speech, though, far too long for me to have delivered it properly. The ideas I come up with are never very practical.

Oh, well. It would have started “Once upon a time” and ended “A sad story, don’t you think?” 

Once upon a time, there lived a boy and a girl. The boy was eighteen and the girl sixteen. He was not unusually handsome, and she was not especially beautiful. They were just an ordinary lonely boy and an ordinary lonely girl, like all the others. But they believed with their whole hearts that somewhere in the world there lived the 100% perfect boy and the 100% perfect girl for them. Yes, they believed in a miracle. And that miracle actually happened.

One day the two came upon each other on the corner of a street.

“This is amazing,” he said. “I’ve been looking for you all my life. You may not believe this, but you’re the 100% perfect girl for me.”

“And you,” she said to him, “are the 100% perfect boy for me, exactly as I’d pictured you in every detail. It’s like a dream.”

They sat on a park bench, held hands, and told each other their stories hour after hour. They were not lonely anymore. They had found and been found by their 100% perfect other. What a wonderful thing it is to find and be found by your 100% perfect other. It’s a miracle, a cosmic miracle.

As they sat and talked, however, a tiny, tiny sliver of doubt took root in their hearts: Was it really all right for one’s dreams to come true so easily?

And so, when there came a momentary lull in their conversation, the boy said to the girl, “Let’s test ourselves – just once. If we really are each other’s 100% perfect lovers, then sometime, somewhere, we will meet again without fail. And when that happens, and we know that we are the 100% perfect ones, we’ll marry then and there. What do you think?”

“Yes,” she said, “that is exactly what we should do.”

And so they parted, she to the east, and he to the west.

The test they had agreed upon, however, was utterly unnecessary. They should never have undertaken it, because they really and truly were each other’s 100% perfect lovers, and it was a miracle that they had ever met. But it was impossible for them to know this, young as they were. The cold, indifferent waves of fate proceeded to toss them unmercifully.

One winter, both the boy and the girl came down with the season’s terrible influenza, and after drifting for weeks between life and death they lost all memory of their earlier years. When they awoke, their heads were as empty as the young D. H. Lawrence’s piggy bank.

They were two bright, determined young people, however, and through their unremitting efforts they were able to acquire once again the knowledge and feeling that qualified them to return as full-fledged members of society. Heaven be praised, they became truly upstanding citizens who knew how to transfer from one subway line to another, who were fully capable of sending a special-delivery letter at the post office. Indeed, they even experienced love again, sometimes as much as 75% or even 85% love.

Time passed with shocking swiftness, and soon the boy was thirty-two, the girl thirty.

One beautiful April morning, in search of a cup of coffee to start the day, the boy was walking from west to east, while the girl, intending to send a special-delivery letter, was walking from east to west, but along the same narrow street in the Harajuku neighborhood ofTokyo. They passed each other in the very center of the street. The faintest gleam of their lost memories glimmered for the briefest moment in their hearts. Each felt a rumbling in their chest. And they knew:

She is the 100% perfect girl for me.

He is the 100% perfect boy for me.

But the glow of their memories was far too weak, and their thoughts no longer had the clarity of fourteen years earlier. Without a word, they passed each other, disappearing into the crowd. Forever.

A sad story, don’t you think? 

Yes, that’s it, that is what I should have said to her.

 
 

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How to Write Interesting Fiction About the Person Who Ate Your Heart for Breakfast

by Pearlsha Abubakar

I’m not talking about Hannibal Lecter, but someone who was NOT as cool, colorful, brilliant, and intelligent. Otherwise, that person wouldn’t have left you, right? But still, you are compelled to write about him. Not because you’re a sadomasochist. OK, maybe you are, just a little. But most probably, you desperately want to understand what the hell happened – and have some good, clean fun while you’re at it. Here are some tips to help you along.

Do not tell all. After your man cut up your heart and eats it for breakfast, you may become very tempted to write an excruciatingly detailed account of your anguish, pass it off as fiction, and get it published the very next day. Unless you are Kris Aquino, resist the urge to tell the whole world about him. Do not use template-type titles like “Song for Eric” or “Song for Anna” or even the anagram or initials of his name, no matter how cleverly mangled. Instead, leave it blank, i.e. “Song for ___.” People might even appreciate your attempt at interactivity.

Recall the least emotional episodes. Scenes of bruxism, tearing of hair, and sobbing are the universal hallmarks of love (and telenovelas) gone wrong. Everybody knows that already. The real gem is in details. Write about the first time you saw your toothbrush lying alongside his in the medicine cabinet. Or how it took years for him to finish off his cologne because he didn’t want to mask the scent of the fabric softener on his clothes. Or how his eyes were still half-open when he slept. The least emotional episodes in your real life will be the most powerful ones in your fiction.

Kill him slowly. It’s not very sophisticated to poison your former lover’s favorite dog in real life to avenge yourself. But by all means, go ahead and turn him into a talking, spit-dribbling pit bull in your fiction. Weave all your painful “what-if” scenarios into a delicious precautionary tale – make your character stay with her incorrigible womanizer of a husband; or make her lose everything for one night of illicit passion; make it so viscerally painful and unpalatable that no woman in her right mind would even dare think about making the mistake. Good luck.

Write in the third person. Restraint, subtlety, mystery, elegance. These are the qualities you can never have in real life, but can create some semblance of in your fiction. Use an omniscient voice. Guide your persona not to make the same mistakes you did. The cargo truck is always right: keep your distance.

Make effective use of clichés. As much as you want your heartbreak of a song or story to be unique and powerful, you must understand and accept that other people have already beaten you to it. Proust, Homer, Beauvior, Rilke, Beethoven, Joni Mitchell, to name just a few. Therefore, you must know all the clichés by heart, and learn how to restate them beautifully. For instance, an absurdist twist can be made from a cliché “love is blind” by making love the name of your character, a blind masseuse looking for love, who finds it in a customer with severe back pain.

Borrow characters from ancient literature. Again, it’s about cultivating humility, for others have already been where you are. Turn to mythology, the Bible or even the Koran for archetypes of that person who ate your heart for breakfast. Is he a player Paris? A fiery Apollo? Jealous god of the Hades? Beautiful Joseph who spurned Queen Zulaika? Incestuous Lot? Or a little of everything? Use archetypes as a basis for your character sketch. You never know which god will turn up on your doorstep.

Respond promptly to comments. Finally, you’ve been published and/or heard. Everyone has heard your song or read your love story full of irony, sadness and cutting witty. Days later, the person who ate your heart for breakfast e-mails you for the first time in years to say that he absolutely loves your work. Promptly thank him and wait until you get home before engaging in acts of delusion (i.e. wishfully thinking “Did he say he loved my work, or is it another way of saying that he still loves me?”) Bask in the delicious pain of memory. Then write again.

(For C, R and Y – it will get better with time.)

– Two Thumps UP!!!!!


 
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Posted by on April 15, 2011 in Essay

 

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